Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on
 

Romney doesn't get that cops and teachers are Americans, too

By Roland Martin, CNN Contributor
updated 10:15 PM EDT, Fri June 8, 2012
Mitt Romney's comments were dismissive of millions of hardworking Americans, Roland Martin says.
Mitt Romney's comments were dismissive of millions of hardworking Americans, Roland Martin says.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Mitt Romney's slam on Obama's remarks was out of touch, says Roland Martin
  • Teachers, firefighters and cops are Americans too, Martin says
  • Martin: We need a serious conversation about what we need in our daily lives
  • Romney doesn't need the Obama camp to make him look out of touch, Martin says

Editor's note: Roland S. Martin is a syndicated columnist and author of "The First: President Barack Obama's Road to the White House." He is a commentator for the TV One cable network and host/managing editor of its Sunday morning news show, "Washington Watch with Roland Martin."

(CNN) -- When Mitt Romney sits across from the Fraternal Order of Police to seek their presidential endorsement, I can't wait to hear his reaction to these men and women carrying guns and tasers when they ask him to explain why he doesn't think the nation needs more of them on the streets.

Mr. Rich Guy sounded like a completely out-of-touch guy when, in an effort to slam President Barack Obama's news conference on the economy, said: "He wants another stimulus, he wants to hire more government workers. He says we need more firemen, more policemen, and more teachers. Did he not get the message of Wisconsin? The American people did. It's time for us to cut back on government and help the American people."

Last I checked, teachers, firefighters and police officers are Americans.

In fact, if you have ever had your home broken into, I'm sure the last thing you want the 911 operator to tell you is they will have to schedule a cop to drop by as if he's an air conditioner repairman.

When your house is going up in flames, I doubt there would be many chuckles if the 911 operator says, "Mitt Romney says you should be happy to have a smaller government, so we won't be able to send someone to put out the fire until Monday morning. Good luck."

This is the kind of ignorance that gets passed off to us as smart political thinking.

Roland Martin
Roland Martin

Trust me, I get the whole argument of downsizing government. But people like Mitt Romney act as if the essential services that makes our neighborhoods, towns, cities and states run isn't done by government employees.

Need that trash picked up? Yeah, it smells a bit funky, but suck it up, Mitt says we can get by with fewer garbage collectors.

Tired of that pothole? Don't complain. Just drive around it since we don't have the manpower to get them fixed in a timely manner.

It's real easy to take shots at government, but when it comes to determining what is essential to our daily lives, we must have a different conversation.

When you're a rich guy like Romney, public school teachers mean nothing to you since you can afford to send your kids to private schools, hire tutors and enjoy those small classrooms. But if you're like most of "the American people" you can't stand overcrowded classrooms and few resources.

But Romney doesn't care. Instead of separating the battle between union contracts and cities from actual people, he chose to make a ridiculous comment and dismiss the millions of hardworking Americans out there.

That's even more laughable considering Republicans call themselves the law-and-order party, and are quick to tout their police endorsements. How many times have we seen Romney's party pals call New York firefighters heroes after 9/11. So, Mitt, should we not bother to expand the ranks of the men and women who keep us safe?

Mitt doesn't have to worry about the Obama campaign or the Democratic Party running ads showing him to be an out-of-touch rich guy who doesn't care about blue-collar workers. We just have to wait for him to open his mouth. And we won't have to wait long.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Roland Martin.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT